Linking Dimensions (values)–1

As the post name suggested, here we will discuss on ways you can link two or more dimensions. The basic idea is make dimensions depend on each other and helps in quick updation of the dimension value.

The two ways via which dimensions can be linked are:

  1. Using Equations
  2. Shared/Link Values

Both the methods can be used in parts as well as assemblies.

Using Equations:

When dimensions are linked in this way, one member of the group is a driving dimension and second or others are driven dimension(s). Changing the value of driving dimension will change all others driven dimensions as per the equation has been set.

I have used a very basic sketch (rectangle) to explain the methods of using equations and link values.

How to use equations to link two dimensions:

  1. Start a new part and start a sketch on any of the plane. Draw a rectangle with any size.
  2. Start dimensioning and give dimension of any one of the side.
  3. Dimension the other side but don’t click on OK.
  4. Click on arrow next to dimension and from the list select “Add equation.”
  5. You’ll see a add equation window pop up with the current dimension there (“D2@Sketch1” in this case) with = sign.
  6. Now select the dimension already created in step 2 above and you’ll see that is added after = sign in the add equation window (“D1@Sketch1” in this case).
  7. Now the equation is “D2@Sketch1” = “D1@Sketch1” which means the value of “D2@Sketch1” will be same as of “D1@Sketch1” (1.000” in this case)
  8. Now say I want “D2@Sketch1” to be half of “D1@Sketch1”. Simply add /2 at the end of the equation. Now the equation will look like “D2@Sketch1″ = “D1@Sketch1″/2.
  9. Click OK to come out of equation editor and you can see the equation listed in the equation window.
  10. Click OK to come out of equation window. You can notice the equation symbol in front of the dimension indicating that this is a driven dimension.
  11. Change the driving dimension value and see the change in the driven dimension value.

This was really a very example of using/creating equations. You can try lot of other settings, values, etc. in equations. And similarly you can create many equations.

6 thoughts on “Linking Dimensions (values)–1

  1. Frank Opiola

    When I use the dimension codes in my property tab builder for a part they give me the correct dimensions in my BOM. The problem I am having is when I mirror a part it doesn’t carry the sketch or extrude dimension into the BOM. I have tried checking the following items to carry into the mirrored part.
    Solid bodies, surface bodies, absorbed and unabsorbed sketches, and custom properties. I keep ending up with (from parent+ d1@sketch1) in my BOM. Do I need to create an seperate property tab with a different code for a mirror part? I am trying to just write a formula so the person creating the parts will not need to manually input a dimension.
    Thanks,
    Frank

    Reply
  2. Chris

    I visited the articles listed prior to finding this obsolete thread, but I could not get the “Linked Values” to work. However, I was trying to use the “Linked Value” with dimensions from within the “Position” portion of the Hole command, and they are evidently not available while trying to position a hole. I could have probably set up a global variable for the hole, but I did not try it. If one set up a global variable is it only native to the file it was setup in?

    Reply
    1. Deepak Gupta Post author

      Hi Chris sorry for missing out your comment. Yes you can set up a variable in the equation manager and then use that in the hole wizard. Also as you might have figured out that global variable are only native to the file they are set up in but using link to external file option, you may link them to a common file if required.

      Reply
  3. Chris

    What if you don’t have the drop down arrow next to the dimension? I’m on Solid Works 2012, should the drop down arrow be there?

    Reply
  4. Ghadge NIlesh

    That was really a very simple and effective example to explain utilisation of equation.

    Thanks Deepak for the explanation

    Reply

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